Footnotes

Footnotes

1 For a transcript of the Treaty 8 document, itself, see Charles Mair (1999). Through the Mackenzie Basin: An Account of the Signing of Treaty No. 8 and the Scrip Commission, 1899, with Introductions by David Leonard and Brian Calliou. The University of Alberta Prss and the Edmonton & Dirstrict Historical Society, Edmonton. Page 162. This 1999 publication is a facsimile reprint of the first portions of Charles Mair`s classic 1908 book, Through the Mackenzie Baisn: A Narrative of the Athabasca and Peace River Treaty Expedition of 1899, With a Map of the Country Ceded and Numberous Photgraphs of Native Life and Scenery. William Briggs, Toronto.

2 Evelyn M. Hansen, ed. (1968). Brick’s Hill Berwyn and Beyond: A History of Berwyn & District. Berwyn Centennal Committee, Alberta. Page 20, cited in G. Neil Reddekopp (1966). The creation and Surrender of the Beaver and Duncan’s Band’s Reserve. Alberta Aboriginal Affairs, Indian Land Claims, Paper No. 2. Page 15, fn. 71.

3 Sir Alexander Mackenzie Historical Society. (1984). Peace River Remembers. Peace River, Alberta. Page 94. Cited in Reddekopp 1996:15, fn. 73. Baptiste Bisson was later employed by the North West Company as a Hunter, then went to the Hudson’s Bay Company in 1818, was at Peace River 1818-1819, in the Athabasca District 1819-1820, and again at Peace River 1810-1821. See E.E. Rich, Editor (1938). Journal of Occurrences in the Athanasca Department by Geroge Simpson 1820 and 1821, and Report. Published by the Champlain Society for the Hudson’s Bay Company Society. Page 64, fn. 2. HBC Governor George Simpson in September 1820 described Baptiste Bisson as the best hunter in the Peacer River District, and May 1821 described him as “without exception, the best large animal hunter in North America.” See: George Simpson to Duncan Finlayson, Peace River District, 29 September 1820; and, GEroge Simpson to GEroge Leith, Northe West Company, Fort Chipewyan, 19 May 1821, both cited in Rich 1938:64, 338.

4 The Napoleon Thomas (or Tomas) family was of Iroquois ancestry; this family was identified from the early 1890s onward living in the Pouce Coupe / Dawson Creek area of northeast British Columbia. Napoleon Thomas’ first wife was Cree, and his second wife was Beaver. See: Loggie Papers, Interivews with Pioneers. Interview of Harry Garbitt, Morberly Lake, BC, 13 August 1955, by Isabel Loggie. Glenbow Archives, Calgary, Alberta. D971.23.L832, file 31; also, Interview of Harry Garbitt, Morberly Lake, BC, June 1956, by Isabel Loggie. Glenbow Archives, Calgary, Alberta. D971.23.L832, file 32. As well, see the Napoleon Tomas Homestead File 32206589. Canada, Department of the Interior, Dominion Lands Branch. Correspondence relating to land settlement in the Railway Belt and the Peace River Block, 1885-1949. BC Archives, Victoria. GR-0436, Series 1.

5 G. Neil Reddekopp (1996). The Creation and Surrender of the Beaver and Duncan‘s Band‘s Reserve. Alberta Aboriginal Affairs, Indian Land Claims, Paper No. 2.

6 Aboriginal and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa. Indian Lands Registry System, Reserve General Abstract Report for Band 451, Duncan‘s First Nation.

7 Other transcriptions of this term include: “Kinishtineau”; “Kiristinon”; “Kiristinous”; and “Kilistinous”). See John J. Honigmann (1981). West Main Cree. In, Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 6, Subarctic. Edited by June Helm. Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. Pp. 227-228. See also David G. Mandelbaum (1979). The Plains Cree: An Ethnographic, Historical, and Comparative Study [based on Mandelbaum‘s 1934-1935 fieldwork]. Canadian Plains Studies 9. Canadian Plains Research Center, University of Regina. Page 15.

8 David W.Pentland, Synonymy section, in, James G.E. Smith (1981). Western Woods Cree. In, Handbook of North American Indians, Vol. 6, Subarctic. Edited by June Helm. Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. Pp. 267-268.

9 William E. Moreau, Editor (2009). The Writings of David Thompson, Volume 1: The Travels, 1850 Version. McGill-Queen‘s University Press, Montreal. P. 95.

10 [Aaron Arrowsmith (circa 1804)]. A Map of America, between Latitudes 40 and 70 North, and Longitudes 45 and 180 West, Exhibiting the Principal Trading Stations of the North West Company. Original held by The National Archives, London, England. Privy Council I, Unbound Papers #3997.